WineHQ

Applications Affected by Bug #22066

Application Name Description version Downloads
ChessBase Chess database program 10
Command & Conquer: The First Decade Complilation of nearly all C&C games to date. 1.x
LDS Scriptures ­The Latter-day Saint collection of Holy Scriptures. The Bible, the Book of Mormon, The Doctrine and Covenants, and Pearl of Great Price. 1.0
LDS Scriptures ­The Latter-day Saint collection of Holy Scriptures. The Bible, the Book of Mormon, The Doctrine and Covenants, and Pearl of Great Price. 1.1
Personal Ancestral File (PAF) Personal Ancestral File (PAF), is a good, free program for entering and manipulating genealogy data.

This is a Free-as-in-Rootbeer desktop database for keeping track of one family's genealogy. Earlier versions (not listed here) were sold commercially for 16-bit DOS, Macintosh and Apple II, but the church bought the publisher out and made later versions available at a token charge or for download. PAF 3 was a 32-bit DOS (DPMI) program that works well under Dosemu. Even though it's free, PAF is well-designed and useful. Many features facilitate fast data-entry and support careful research practices.

New major versions have generally been able to read the data files from one version back, but all versions have supported import from and export to the publically-documented GEDCOM format. Most other genealogy programs, including the Linux native ones, support import and export of GEDCOM data.

Currently, not everything works under wine (check the bug database and per-version comments for details).

There are a couple of Linux alternatives:

  • Gramps (Debian package) - XML-based, written in Python. Good data-model (reads all of GEDCOM 5.5), handles large family trees well
  • GeneWeb (Debian package) - Written in OCaml, with CGI interface. Simpler data-mode, but handles 400k-name families without trouble.
4.x
Personal Ancestral File (PAF) Personal Ancestral File (PAF), is a good, free program for entering and manipulating genealogy data.

This is a Free-as-in-Rootbeer desktop database for keeping track of one family's genealogy. Earlier versions (not listed here) were sold commercially for 16-bit DOS, Macintosh and Apple II, but the church bought the publisher out and made later versions available at a token charge or for download. PAF 3 was a 32-bit DOS (DPMI) program that works well under Dosemu. Even though it's free, PAF is well-designed and useful. Many features facilitate fast data-entry and support careful research practices.

New major versions have generally been able to read the data files from one version back, but all versions have supported import from and export to the publically-documented GEDCOM format. Most other genealogy programs, including the Linux native ones, support import and export of GEDCOM data.

Currently, not everything works under wine (check the bug database and per-version comments for details).

There are a couple of Linux alternatives:

  • Gramps (Debian package) - XML-based, written in Python. Good data-model (reads all of GEDCOM 5.5), handles large family trees well
  • GeneWeb (Debian package) - Written in OCaml, with CGI interface. Simpler data-mode, but handles 400k-name families without trouble.
5.x
Spore
  • CREATE your universe - from tidepool microbes to intergalactic starships, make everything using intuitive drag-and-drop tools.
  • EVOLVE your creature - develop your species through five stages: Cell, Creature, Tribe, Civilization and Space.
  • EXPLORE your planet and beyond - discover thousands of new worlds and befriend or fight amazing alien civilizations.
  • SHARE with the world - player creations are automatically exchanged, always keeping the game new and surprising.
1.0 Creature Creator Trial
The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion

The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion  (often referenced as Oblivion) is a cult single-player role-playing video game (RPG) developed by Bethesda Game Studios and published by Bethesda Softworks and the Take-Two Interactive subsidiary 2K Games. It is the fourth installment in The Elder Scrolls action fantasy video game series, following The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind. Oblivion was released March 20, 2006.

Oblivion incorporates open-ended (or "sandbox") gameplay. The main quest can be postponed or ignored as the player explores the expansive game world, follows side-quests, interacts with NPCs, slays monsters, and develops their character. The player is free to go anywhere in the realm of Cyrodiil at any time while playing the game, even after completing the main quest. The game never ends, and the player may build up the character indefinitely.

It uses DirectX9 3D output with HDR or Bloom rendering capabilities.

1.2.x